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Utility Study

To provide the best possible customer service, the City of Issaquah is considering the impacts of providing utility services to all of its citizens within our existing City limits.

Who provides my water?

Most of Issaquah already receives utility service from the City. However, 1.8 percent of Bellevue’s water system and 7.6 percent of the Sammamish Plateau Water and Sewer District (SPWSD) fall inside our City limits. View a map of service areas.


Why did the City of Issaquah conduct a utility study?

Provided Bellevue and SPWSD are cooperative with this possible switch, it is estimated that typical single-family customers joining Issaquah would pay less.

Providing these utility services could also enhance customer service by reducing confusion on who offers what service while avoiding differences in fees. 

Would my rates change if assumption occurred?

Assuming Bellevue and SPWSD are cooperative with this possible switch, here’s an estimated breakdown:

Typical SPWSD single-family customer
With SPWSD: $105.58
With City of Issaquah: $95.57

Typical City of Bellevue single-family customer
With City of Bellevue: $105.43
With City of Issaquah: $95.57

These rate projections factor in the cost of maintaining and replacing the infrastructure as needed. 

Can the City of Issaquah provide the same level of service?

Yes, we can provide a comprehensive level of service to all customers within our existing City limits. We’ve operated our water utility for decades, and we strive to provide the best possible water and customer service to our residents.

Moreover, our City serves as a hub for multiple services, many of which these customers already use. Those services include police, roads, emergency response and permitting.

What does the law say about assumption?

Assumption of water and sewer districts' areas within City limits is encouraged by the state Growth Management Act and King County policies. It’s also our policy to provide services to all customers within City limits. 

We want to work cooperatively with neighboring jurisdictions while studying this assumption option.

Would water and sewer service change for residents of Klahanie and nearby communities?

Residents in Klahanie and nearby communities will decide — as early as February 2014 — if they want to annex to Issaquah. The area, called the Klahanie Potential Annexation Area, is currently served by SPWSD. Annexation in itself would make no change to water and sewer service.

If Klahanie is annexed, the City could conduct another utility study in the future to determine how best to serve residents in Klahanie and nearby communities. No decision on this issue has been made at this time.